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Honey Nut Cheerios Wants You To Help Save Canada's Bee Population

New campaign is using viral video clips and free flower seeds to raise awareness of the environmental threat.

Honey Nut Cheerios Wants You To Help Save Canada's Bee Population

For the last few years, concerns over the increasing death toll of honey bees have gotten louder and louder. Across Canada and U.S., the honey bee population has seen its numbers fall, with no clear explanation. The consequences, however, are much easier to see. In the U.S. alone, the value of bees' pollination to crops are estimated to be worth $10 billion to $15 billion a year.

In a marketing move of solidarity, Honey Nut Cheerios (who's mascot happens to be a honey bee) has launched the "Bring Back The Bees" campaign in Canada, to raise awareness of the issue and inspire people to help support Canada’s bees by planting wildflowers in their communities. For six weeks, the cereal's mascot Buzz will be missing from boxes, and the brand is giving away free seed packs through its Bring Back The Bees site, in the hopes of planting 35 million wildflowers to help save the bees.

The spot for the campaign, by agency Cossette, features clips of familiar animal rescue videos—like GoPro's "Fireman Saves A Kitten"—set to a cover of Mr. Mister's 1985 hit "Broken Wings," by Toronto’s Choir! Choir! Choir!.

In a statement from the brand, University of Minnesota Entomology prof Dr. Marla Spivak supported the project. "There are a range of threats to Canada’s bee population, but among the biggest are the elimination of flowering plants and ground cover in urban and rural areas alike," Spivak said. "The goal of planting 35 million wildflowers will go a long way toward helping provide the natural habitat and food supply that is essential for healthy, sustainable bee colonies."

It's not the first time a brand has waded into the honey bee cause. Since 2008, Haagen-Daz has been supporting efforts for sustainable pollination and helping protect bee populations.

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