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Oscar Acceptance Speeches Are Getting A Much-Needed Overhaul This Year

But what’s great in theory could go down in a blaze of telecast humiliation.

Oscar Acceptance Speeches Are Getting A Much-Needed Overhaul This Year

Winner Julianne Moore gives her acceptance speech as she holds her statuette for Actress in a Leading Role during the 87th Annual Academy Awards at Dolby Theatre on February 22, 2015 in Hollywood, California.

[Photo: Christopher Polk, Getty Images]

Producers for the Academy Awards telecast Reginald Hudlin and David Hall announced earlier this month that Oscar nominees have been asked to fill out a card with the names of the people they wish to thank. And should they win, those names will be displayed across the screen during their speech.

This is an attempt to avoid the numbing roll-call of agents, lawyers, managers, and producers that mean nothing to viewers at home, in favor of more heartfelt, off-the-cuff effusions of gratitude. It’s certainly a noble effort to allow winners to make better use of their 45-seconds onstage before the first few notes from the orchestra pit signal an impending dismissal.

However, everything that can go wrong most definitely will.

As great of an idea it is to scroll the names of those deserving a shoutout, the producers of the Oscars have on their hands a perfect storm of awkward moments:

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