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Adidas Originals Gets Optimistic For The Future In New Global Ad Campaign

The three stripes streetwear brand ditches the dystopian for a more creative outlook.

Adidas Originals Gets Optimistic For The Future In New Global Ad Campaign

We've seen the brand watch soccer with Daft Punk in Mos Eisley, host an epic house party with everyone from David Beckham to Snoop, and try to redefine what it means to be a superstar. Now in its newest global ad campaign, Adidas Originals ditches the cliched dystopian future and instead gets a bit more optimistic.

The first spot features what appears to be card-carrying members of the Hypebeast brigade, strolling through your garden variety dystopian scenes—grimy alleyways, gleaming corridors of soulless metal and concrete, a selfie stick honor guard of botox zombies, y'know, the usual. The campaign also features eight upcoming artists and cultural influencers from around the world, including model Luka Sabbat, artist Kyu Steed, stylist and blogger Aleali May, photographer Ikwa Zhao, Reese Cooper, Design Butler, Yuki Matsuda, and Cleveland Cavaliers star Iman Shumpert.

"We haven’t had an 'umbrella' brand campaign for Adidas Originals in many years, so strategically it was important for us to find one common theme that embraced our values of community, courage, and creativity, from which all product stories could spin out from," says Alegra O’Hare, Adidas Originals senior director of brand communications.

Leo Premutico, chief creative officer and co-founder of agency Johannes Leonardo says it felt like the right time to take on the future. "The brand POV is that to create is to challenge the status quo," says Premutico. "This year, based on the company's design philosophy of creating products for the tomorrow by pulling from Originals' rich archive, the future theme felt like the right topic to take on. Not only does it stem from the product line, but it's clearly a hot cultural topic. Every second film or article seems to touch on some sort of dystopian version of the future. But if you look at what the brand has created, and the mindset of our consumer, they have a far different interpretation—a positive future that can be shaped by creative minds."

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