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See The 25 Most Beautiful Data Visualizations Of 2013

The Kantar Information Is Beautiful Awards recognize the year's high points in data viz.

  • <p><a href="http://www.accurat.it/" target="_blank">Nobels, no degrees</a><br />
Click to expand<br />
"This visualization explores the story of Nobel prizes through years.<br />
Visualized for each laureate are prize category, year the prize was awarded, and age of the recipient at the time, as well as principal academic affiliations and hometown. Each dot represents a Nobel laureate, and each recipient is positioned according to the year the prize was awarded (x axis) and his or her age at the time of the award (y axis)."</p>
  • <p><a href="http://www.dgquarterly.com/" target="_blank">How to win an Oscar</a><br />
Click to expand.<br />
"We analyse the characters played by every winner of an ‘actor/actress in a leading role’ Oscar since 1928 to work out the parts which most reliably lead to glory. Historic South American criminals, it appears, need not apply."</p>
  • <p><a href="http://www.emoto2012.org/" target="_blank">emoto</a> Installation<br />
"Emoto captured and visu­al­ised the global response around the London 2012 Olympic Games on Twitter. The project consisted of an interactive online visualization, realtime data-journalism experiments and its core component: the phys­ical data sculpture presented here."</p>
  • <p>Taxonomy of <a href="http://timleong.com/" target="_blank">Comic Book Characters</a><br />
Click to expand</p>
  • <p><a href="http://www.valentinadefilippo.co.uk/" target="_blank">Field of Commemoration</a><br />
Click to expand</p>
  • <p>Global Warning<br />
Click to expand</p>
  • <p>The 39 stats: <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/film/picture/2013/aug/12/alfred-hitchcock-film-statistics" target="_blank">Charting Hitchcock Obsessions</a><br />
Click to expand</p>
  • <p><a href="http://healthland.time.com/2013/02/20/what-makes-health-care-so-expensive/" target="_blank">Why Health Care Is So Expensive</a><br />
Click to expand</p>
  • <p>Terra Mater | <a href="http://www.behance.net/gallery/ixtract-Terra-Mater/9594319" target="_blank">Modern Star Dust</a><br />
Click to expand</p>
  • <p><a href="http://www.bloomberg.com/billionaires/2013-11-22/cya" target="_blank">Bloomberg Billionaires Index</a><br />
Click to expand</p>
  • <p><a href="http://listen.hatnote.com/" target="_blank">Listen to Wikipedia</a><br />
"Listen to Wikipedia is a visualization and sonification of Wikipedia's live recent changes data. The sounds indicate addition to (bells) or subtraction from (strings) a Wikipedia articles, and the pitch is inversely proportional to the size of the edit (a lower pitch means a bigger edit). Green circles show edits from unregistered contributors, and purple circles mark edits performed by automated bots. A string swell welcomes a new user to the site. There’s something reassuring about knowing that every user makes a noise, every edit has a voice in the roar. Now, let’s go make some noise."</p>
  • <p><a href="http://guns.periscopic.com/" target="_blank">U.S. Gun Deaths</a><br />
Click to expand</p>
  • <p><a href="http://hereistoday.com/" target="_blank">Here Is Today</a><br />
Like many of the list, you really have to look at the interactive version of this simple visualization of relative time. Click the link above.</p>
  • <p><a href="http://infogr.am/" target="_blank">Infogram</a></p>
  • <p><a href="http://viz.ged-project.de/" target="_blank">GED VIZ: Visualizing Global Economic Relations</a></p>
  • <p><a href="https://getdataseed.com/" target="_blank">Dataseed</a></p>
  • <p>Politicians' Salaries and Income Inequality<br />
Click to expand</p>
  • <p><a href="http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/mgi/in_the_news/urban_world_app" target="_blank">Urban World</a></p>
  • <p>The Atlas of Kant’s Legacy<br />
Click to expand</p>
  • <p><a href="http://www.kimalbrecht.com/project/meteorites/" target="_blank">Meteorites 1900-2000</a></p>
  • <p>Here I Go Again<br />
Click to expand</p>
  • 01 /25
    | Data Visualization: Gold & Studio Award

    Nobels, no degrees
    Click to expand
    "This visualization explores the story of Nobel prizes through years.
    Visualized for each laureate are prize category, year the prize was awarded, and age of the recipient at the time, as well as principal academic affiliations and hometown. Each dot represents a Nobel laureate, and each recipient is positioned according to the year the prize was awarded (x axis) and his or her age at the time of the award (y axis)."

  • 02 /25
    | Data Visualization: Silver

    How to win an Oscar
    Click to expand.
    "We analyse the characters played by every winner of an ‘actor/actress in a leading role’ Oscar since 1928 to work out the parts which most reliably lead to glory. Historic South American criminals, it appears, need not apply."

  • 03 /25
    | Data Visualization: Bronze

    emoto Installation
    "Emoto captured and visu­al­ised the global response around the London 2012 Olympic Games on Twitter. The project consisted of an interactive online visualization, realtime data-journalism experiments and its core component: the phys­ical data sculpture presented here."

  • 04 /25
    | Data Visualization: Honourable Mention #1 & Individual Award (Tied)

    Taxonomy of Comic Book Characters
    Click to expand

  • 05 /25
    | Data Visualization: Honourable Mention #2

    Field of Commemoration
    Click to expand

  • 06 /25
    | Infographic: Gold

    Global Warning
    Click to expand

  • 07 /25
    | Infographic: Silver

    The 39 stats: Charting Hitchcock Obsessions
    Click to expand

  • 08 /25
    | Infographic: Honourable Mention

    Why Health Care Is So Expensive
    Click to expand

  • 09 /25
    | Infographic: Honourable Mention

    Terra Mater | Modern Star Dust
    Click to expand

  • 10 /25
    | Interactive: Gold & Grand Prize: Most Beautiful

    Bloomberg Billionaires Index
    Click to expand

  • 11 /25
    | Interactive: Silver

    Listen to Wikipedia
    "Listen to Wikipedia is a visualization and sonification of Wikipedia's live recent changes data. The sounds indicate addition to (bells) or subtraction from (strings) a Wikipedia articles, and the pitch is inversely proportional to the size of the edit (a lower pitch means a bigger edit). Green circles show edits from unregistered contributors, and purple circles mark edits performed by automated bots. A string swell welcomes a new user to the site. There’s something reassuring about knowing that every user makes a noise, every edit has a voice in the roar. Now, let’s go make some noise."

  • 12 /25
    | Interactive: Bronze

    U.S. Gun Deaths
    Click to expand

  • 13 /25
    | Interactive: Honourable Mention

    Here Is Today
    Like many of the list, you really have to look at the interactive version of this simple visualization of relative time. Click the link above.

  • 14 /25
    | Motion Infographic: Gold

    The Solar System--Our Home in Space

  • 15 /25
    | Motion Infographic: Silver

    New York City Carbon Emissions

  • 16 /25
    | Motion Infographic: Bronze

    BBC Knowledge DNA Explainer

  • 17 /25
    | Motion Infographic: Honourable Mention

    Bitcoin Explained

  • 18 /25
    | Tool: Gold

    Infogram

  • 19 /25
    | Tool: Silver

    GED VIZ: Visualizing Global Economic Relations

  • 20 /25
    | Tool: Bronze

    Dataseed

  • 21 /25
    | Community Award

    Politicians' Salaries and Income Inequality
    Click to expand

  • 22 /25
    | Corporate Award

    Urban World

  • 23 /25
    | Individual Award (Tied)

    The Atlas of Kant’s Legacy
    Click to expand

  • 24 /25
    | Student Award (Tied)

    Meteorites 1900-2000

  • 25 /25
    | Student Award (Tied)

    Here I Go Again
    Click to expand

It's an understatement to say that the data visualization sphere has exploded over the past several years. As we look to understand the increasing, mind-bending amount of information that we all generate across all areas of endeavor, data artists have created works that have brought beauty and clarity to everything from the minutiae of our personal lives to geopolitical trends. And, of course, as more data is visualized in more ways, we've experienced the fatigue that comes with gratuitous, ham-handed assemblies of facts and figures.

To remind us of what data visualization can be, in the right hands, data viz studio Information Is Beautiful and research company Kantar created the Information Is Beautiful Awards. The contest was launched last year and the 2013 winners were just announced. The competition featured data visualization, infographics, and data journalism and first place carried a $25,000 prize. The winners were chosen by a jury chaired by IIB founder David McCandless and Kantar creative director Aziz Cami and that included RISD president John Maeda, editor of Creative Review, Patrick Burgoyne, Stamen's Eric Rodenbeck and George Oates, and London-based designer and data artist Stefanie Posavec.

"How to Win an Oscar," a data visualization from Delayed Gratification Quarterly, shows links between Academy Award winners going back to 1928. Or, if you'd like to know how far each Hitchcock character plummets to his or her death, the Guardian has a comprehensive graphic illustrating morbid Hitchcockian trivia. Or maybe you'd like to see the daily rankings of billionaires sorted by age, gender, or industry, which Bloomberg serves up in an interactive visual.

Grand Prize Winner "Most Beautiful" & Gold in "Interactive" section

Alongside the medal-winning examples above, there's great info-art to ogle on the short list. Check out a "Taxonomy of Comic Book Characters" and "Politicians' Salaries and Income Inequality," in which inequality is demonstrated by belly size.

See the winners and other highlights in the gallery above.