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Glaring Lack of Irony In Alanis Morissette's "Ironic" Fixed Via Fansourcing

The most seemingly ironic yet just sort of funny thing about Alanis Morissette’s mid-'90s karaoke staple, "Ironic," has long been the fact that none of the supposedly ironic situations the song mentions are actually ironic. It took a parody to get the song’s premise right.

Song parodies on YouTube are often tedious things to be avoided. Not to single any of them out as being worse than the rest, but the recent Daft Punk/Marvel’s The Avengers mashup, Get Loki, for example, is the goofily groan-inducing standard. They’re like bad puns that are four minutes long. In fact, Funny or Die’s Nick Wiger made the ultimate statement on disposable song parodies with last fall’s trippy meta-video Gungan Style. Of course, every now and then a song parody comes along that makes all the tedious pap preceding and following it worth the journey.

One of the most memorable elements of Alanis Morissette’s mid-'90s karaoke staple, "Ironic," has long been the fact that none of the supposedly ironic situations the song mentions are actually ironic. "Meeting the man of your dreams and then meeting his beautiful wife"—the story of my life—is inconvenient, and perhaps unfortunate, but not ironic, as it’s defined. Whether Morissette intended it to be that way, it took a parody to get it right. Comedian Eliza Hurwitz and her singer-songwriter sibling, Rachael, recently released "It’s Finally Ironic," a very literal corrective to Alanis’s melodic lament.

The video, which reenacts the memorable multiplicity-of-Morissettes-in-a-car concept of the original, "fixes" each scenario mentioned in the song by injecting them with true irony. The Hurwitz sisters make their premise known immediately, with the opening lines: "An old man turned 98. He won the lottery and died the next day (from a severe paper cut from his lottery ticket)." Other mini-vignettes are given a good goosing as well.

The song also addresses the original’s creator directly. "We fixed it, Alanis," Hurwitz breathily intones during the chorus. The only irony left would be if Alanis never heard this new version. Or maybe that would merely be sad.