The “voyage of discovery is not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.” In other words, humans aren’t necessarily attracted to the allure of the new, as much as we like to see things we’re already familiar with in a new way.

Neuroscientists explain that synapses occur inside the brain when we’ve made a connection between various different things. The more random the components connected, the more synapses occur. Synapses are the basis of creativity. In other words, synapses firing equal creative joy.

In the language of the visual web, when we share a video or an image, we’re not just sharing the object, we’re also sharing in the emotional response it creates.

Start thinking like a creator, less like an advertiser.

Start thinking like a creator, less like an advertiser.

Start thinking like a creator, less like an advertiser.

Start thinking like a creator, less like an advertiser.

Start thinking like a creator, less like an advertiser.

Start thinking like a creator, less like an advertiser.

Start thinking like a creator, less like an advertiser.

Start thinking like a creator, less like an advertiser.

Start thinking like a creator, less like an advertiser.

Co.Create

Memes With Meaning: Why We Create And Share Cat Videos And Why It Matters To People And Brands

Google’s Abigail Posner explains why those screaming goat videos aren’t just a mindless distraction; they reflect a real human need to elevate the everyday, make connections, and exchange energy. Here, she outlines how brands can participate meaningfully.

"This is what the Internet is all about, people. A killer song, a stupid meme, a nostalgic throwback to 2001, and, most important, bites of dumb hilarity that come in 30-second bursts."
Huffington Post on the Harlem Shake, February 2013

The stats tell us that we’re spending more and more time on the web creating, curating, and sharing visual content. We uploaded over half a million variations of Harlem Shake to YouTube in the past few months. Google searches for Cat GIFs hit an all-time high last month. And we took 380 billion photos last year—that’s 10% of all the photos taken . . . ever. But let’s be honest—these memes are fun, but they don’t matter, right? They’re pretty much a waste of time.

As the head of Google’s Agency Strategic Planning team, it’s my job to work with brands and creative agencies to help develop their ideas in the digital space. So I had to ask: Why would we be doing so much of all this "visual play" if it really means so little to us? And ultimately, what can brands learn from it to engage with their followers more meaningfully?

These questions kicked off a new chapter in what we’re calling The Engagement Project. This ongoing series shares insights, perspectives, and ideas on how brands can connect with consumers more deeply in the participation age.

To get to the bottom of these memes, we assembled a team of original thinkers—anthropologists, digital vanguards, and content creators—to dig a little deeper into this "visual web." We also spoke to gen-Cers—the people who grew up on the web or behave as though they did—and who thrive on creation, curation, connection, and community.

The research showed us that far from distracting us from more serious things, these viral pictures, videos, and memes reconnect us to an essential part of ourselves. And by understanding what’s at the root of our obsession with the visual web, brands can create the kind of content that resonates in today’s culture.

The Fascinating Familiar

"Who knew there was such a thing as goose barnacle gathering? That’s fascinating . . . it was cool to see something new about a subject that I already thought I knew."
—Travis, gen-C, age 27

The visual web is full of amazing and beautiful things. So why did a picture of my breakfast I posted this morning get 37 "likes"?

Marcel Proust knew. The great French novelist once wrote that the "voyage of discovery is not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes." In other words, humans aren’t necessarily attracted to the allure of the new, as much as we like to see things we’re already familiar with in a new way.

This is exactly what’s happening on the web. It may seem that all we’re doing is just capturing every mundane moment. But look closely. These everyday moments are shot, displayed, and juxtaposed in a way that offers us a new perspective. And then all of a sudden these everyday moments, places, and things look . . . fascinating.

This fascination with the familiar is deeply rooted. As humans, we’ve always wondered, "Is this really all there is" Through poetry, art, and philosophy—and now the visual web—we strive to elevate the everyday by feeding our appetite for imagination and discovery.

And the web allows us to do this on a scale we’ve simply never seen before. By seeing the miraculous in the mundane, we’re learning to fall in love with the world again, to laugh with it, and to be fascinated by it.

Synaptic Play

"I think that’s the genius of it—to be able to go anywhere or pull up anything. Linear meets nonlinear is kind of the way that I envision it."
—Becky, gen-C, age 32

Let’s say you’re a fan of Les Mis. But you also think the whole screaming goats thing is hilarious. Even though they seem very different, to you they’re connected—if only by the passion you share for them. So you take a leap of imagination and make that connection.

Huh? What in the world is going on here? I often find myself riddled with the same confusion when I listen to my 6-year-old daughter jump from frogs to princesses to polka dots in the same sentence. No coincidence. Both are reflecting a similar dynamic.

Neuroscientists explain that synapses occur inside the brain when we’ve made a connection between various different things. The more random the components connected, the more synapses occur. Synapses are the basis of creativity. In other words, synapses firing equals creative joy.

As kids, that happens all the time because everything is new. Everything is unlike. And we aren’t constrained by the rules about what "goes together." Why else was putting the Barbie in the toy car wash more fun than putting the car in the car wash?

The visual web frees us to return to this childlike state, where we can adventure through a whole array of different, seemingly unrelated images and clips—be they old, new, from a world away or own backyard—sparking our all-important synapses and helping us come up with new combinations and ideas so easily.

Uninhibited by linearity and stimulated by all the access to imagery, synaptic play takes hold and we’re free to indulge in a purer kind of creativity. Or, as we call it, the Nyan Cat Dubstep Remix. And even if we’re just watching these crazy creations, we are still celebrating and appreciating all this synaptic play, and it inspires us!

The Energy Exchange

"You get even more enjoyment when you know other people are enjoying it."
—Dan, gen-C, age 23

The only thing better than going on this journey of discovery is sharing it with others. This "gift" of sharing contributes to an energy exchange that amplifies our own pleasure—and is something we’re hardwired to do.

Psychoanalyst Donald Winnicott figured out that our first emotional action as babies is to respond to our mother’s smile with a smile of our own. Winnicott called it the "social smile," and it teaches us that our own joy increases when we offer it to others because it forges a bond between us.

In the language of the visual web, when we share a video or an image, we’re not just sharing the object, we’re also sharing in the emotional response it creates.

There are billions of these energy exchanges happening every day. Whether we’re posting, commenting, liking, repinning, or +1ing, our new visual culture is one in which we’re constantly offering each other little gifts, little moments of pleasure that remind us we’re truly and deeply bonded to one another.

The Meaning Behind this New Normal

In the end, it all matters: every meme, GIF, and seemingly silly video. Nowhere else can we rediscover the fascination of our everyday world, spark synapses that unlock our creative potential, and amplify the joy we feel in a global exchange of energy. And through it all, we connect more deeply with each other—and ourselves.

So what can we do to start tapping into all this visual play? Most important, start thinking like a creator, less like an advertiser. While posting the glossy photos from the photo shoot or :30 spots online may be part of your approach, it shouldn’t be your entire approach. Think content, not commercials. Here are a few thoughts to get started:

Help us rediscover the beauty of a forgotten familiar.
Find something familiar—in your product, brand, or from people’s lives—and help us see it in a fascinating new light. It could be as simple as taking a kitchen appliance and turning it into a science experiment or reminding people to capture just one second of their daily lives and compile a beautiful montage.

Find ways to spark synaptic play and participation.
Search for your brand online. Chances are your fans are already mixing and mashing your brand with something seemingly unrelated. Build on it, fuel it, steer it, and help us make more with it.

Give happiness we can share in.
Ditch the pitch. Instead, start an energy exchange. Create content that reminds us of our own capacity for excitement, happiness, and vivacity so we want to share in it with others.

Abigail Posner is Head of Strategic Planning And Agency Development, Google.
This piece is part of an ongoing series called The Engagement Project—perspectives, insights, and ideas on how to connect with your consumers in the participation age. Follow us at +ThinkwithGoogle and @ThinkwithGoogle for updates.

[Image: Flickr users Photo Extremist, and Mike Baird]

Add New Comment

14 Comments

  • Neville Anderson

    Everywhere you go geeks are talking about human behaviors as if they have been invented by the internet, as if no one ever enjoyed shared cultural experiences before the internet.  As if they there was no such thing as a meme before the internet (a word invented by Richard Dawkins in 1976).  There is absolutely nothing here that really smart advertisers have not know forever.  Except that "curating" was just called enjoying, "sharing" was just called talking about.  Creating culturally popular moments has ALWAYS been what advertising has been about.  And the process is exactly the same today.  What is with these people?  It's like they woke up and don't believe anything they missed while they were sleeping actually happened.  Wankers.

  • Christina Tarkoff

    Thanks Abigail! Your post reminds me of how the early 20th century modern artists (such as Marcel Duchamp & friends) challenged the boundaries of art from "real" life.

  • Jörg Lenuweit

    Abigail, this is really an enlightening read! A bold and exciting positioning of the social web in our cultural evolution. Thank you!

  • Chris van Rooyen

    Isn't this essentially the essence of creativity? We all have it in us. It is the need to see things differently, do things differently. It promotes freedom of thought without which we will become zombies. Children respond more readily because their minds are still exploring without boundaries. Experiencing creativity around us stimulates us in so many ways, not the least of which the stimulus of positive thought. Those that exercise constant creative energy are eternal optimists. Our natural gravitation towards creativeness is stimulated by the observation of the unusual whether consciously or subliminally. It is not strictly the meme that stimulates us, but the content and thought behind the concept that gets us going. The meme is a super efficient (albeit random) vehicle that transports the concept.

  • AdaPia

    There is always meaning behind action, and I'm glad you and your team are seeking the cultural/anthropological significance of the phenomena of the visual web. I especially appreciate how you liken it to energy, which is tied to quantum mechanics and spirituality - our interconnectedness on all levels. Thank you!

  • Chris van Rooyen

    The spider video is hilarious! He hit the ground running, I hit the floor laughing! Just some useless information, that was a 'he' not a 'she' (the male abdomen is smaller and the she is muuuuchhh bigger). They can bite but are not poisonous. They can leap a distance of about 2 meters and when at speed run with legs almost vertical. We call them rain spiders because they come indoors usually just before or after the rain.

    P.S. Great article Abigail. It has helped my perspective considerably.

  • Tony Cecala

    I <3 the idea of "Synaptic Play". Posner's term fancifully describes Sean Jackson's notion of "Mental Stimulation" as one of the core principles behind what people want. Copyblogger's Jackson wrote that after the core needs for food and shelter we are simply looking for "something that breaks the monotony of existence — the day-in, day-out struggles that seem redundant and boring". Want the 4-Step Secret Formula for Success? 1. Employ Abigail and Sean's ideas, 2. Study Ben Huh's empire, 3. ???, 4. Profit. ;)

  • Jonathan Raymond

    Beautiful ... I love how you broke this down and presented it ... sage advice to balance the our self-referential impulses as branders and marketers ...

  • Naomi Garnice

    I love this article, and the cat floating on a burrito.

    Thank you for sharing!

    Naomi

  • Jiah

    Abigail this article is totally AWESOME! Thank you so much! All of your major insights are actually played out in this article. So much Synaptic Play and Joy came to me reading and participating and I can hardly wait to apply some of these new insights into my new content and sharing with others.
    Dreams do come true with Dolphin Dreamtime! Cheers, Jiah Miesel