In Miami, El Palacios De Los Jugos. "It does not get more Miami than this." - Michael Schwartz

David Chang recommends Noodletown on Bowery.

Paris: Le Comptoir Du Relais. "You can get lucky at lunch without a reservation and I always recommend the pig’s trotter (foot)." - Josef Centeno

San Francisco: Atelier Crenn. "Just put yourself in their hands and you can’t go wrong." - Jason Fox
David Chang recommends Benu.

If these recos seem too obvious, perhaps an Icelandic hot dog at Baejarins Beztu in Reykjavik. "The best in the world," says chef Thrainn Freyr Vigfusson.

Chef Nuno Mendes recommends London’s St. John Bread and Wine in Spitalfields.

Réné Redzepi, chef at Noma (selected by many of the chefs in the book) singles out his favorite café, in Copenhagen, Coffee Collective.

Réné Redzepi, chef at Noma (selected by many of the chefs in the book) singles out his favorite café, in Copenhagen, Coffee Collective.

Co.Create

Where Chefs Eat And You Should Too

A new international restaurant guide relies on chefs to pick their favorite spots around the world. If the mammoth book doesn’t fit in your luggage, no worries: wait for the app, which is coming soon.

Looking for a breakfast spot in Argentina, a local fave in Latvia, or a late night tapas bar in Norway? Where Chefs Eat: A Guide to Chefs’ Favourite Restaurants has you covered. As long as you don’t mind lugging along a 662-page book.

With more than 2,000 recommendations from 400 top chefs (including Gabrielle Hamilton, David Chang, and Daniel Boulud, among others) around the globe, the international restaurant guide includes everything from bargain noodle joints to high-end brasseries.

Billed as "the ultimate insiders’ guide," the project was a collaboration between publisher Phaidon and food writer Joe Warwick, cofounder of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards. After selecting the chefs, Warwick and a 25-person editorial team e-mailed them eight questions, including "which restaurant would you travel any distance to eat at?"

Chef recommendations are key to finding the best restaurants, according to Warwick, because "they tend to be plugged into their local restaurant scene and beyond—and are full of insider tips."

Designed by former I.D. art director Kobi Benezri, Where Chefs Eat features more than 50 fonts and, according to Benezri, was inspired by British phone books from the 1950s and '60s. The finished product is nearly as heavy as a phone book too.

There’s no question that the book contains oodles of info about where to eat around the world, but realistically, who wants to schlep such a hefty tome with them when they’re on the road?

"It’s about the size of a concise Oxford Dictionary. I’ve managed to fit one in my luggage," says Warwick, who acknowledges that some readers may prefer to jot down recommendations ahead of time and leave the book behind.

Or else they might rely on the soon-to-be-released iPhone and iPad app (coming next month), which will allow users to search the entire guide and alert you when a recommended restaurant is nearby.

Plus, since the restaurant business is so fluid, Warwick says he might consider updating the book at some point. "The world is a big place with lots of talented chefs and great restaurants, and it would be great to get in even more of them next time around."

Click through the slide show for images from the book and chefs’ recommendations.

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1 Comments

  • rudy

    Download Chef's Feed. It already is "fluid," updated frequently with a great UI. This book's already dated, guaranteed.