Co.Create

An Emotional Android And A Coke Classic Reimagined: The Top 5 Ads Of The Week

An android Michael Fassbender, Lego’s movie-making app, and the world’s smallest Ikea store star in our Best Ads of the Week roundup.

Each week, Co.Create will run down the 5 best creative ideas and executions from the wide world of brands. From apps to Twitter feeds and content of every kind--it’s all brand creativity and it’s all up for citation. Here, this week’s top 5.

5. No-Kill Los Angeles
Ad Legend Lee Clow is known for many things--surfing, co-creating the epoch-defining Apple “1984” spot, and being a proponent of the idea of advertising as “media arts.” He’s also known to be a dog lover (Pedigree has been a long-time client of his agency TBWA\Chiat\Day). He’s put his influence and creative energy to work in No-Kill Los Angeles, an initiative created by a coalition of ad creatives that includes Omnicom’s innovation arm, Let There Be Dragons. NKLA aims to lower the number of animals euthanized in Los Angeles, and to make L.A. a no-kill city by 2017. A supporting campaign includes a video, “Makaveli,” and a series of stark black-and-white posters.

4. Ikea "World’s Smallest Ikea Store"
We’re always excited when someone does something interesting with a banner ad. Here, Ikea makes a statement about saving space, with a combination catalog, display ad, and shopping experience. Users can mouse over the banner and each of the 300x250 pixels pops out to reveal one of 2,800 products. See the banner here and watch the demo video below.

3. Coca-Cola "Sharing A Coke"
Hong Kong graphic design student Jonathan Mak Long gained acclaim in October with a much-viewed tribute to Steve Jobs on the occasion of the Apple founder’s passing. Among the fans of Long’s work: Ogilvy China, which tapped Long for an open-ended brief for Coke that resulted in this elegant reinterpretation of an iconic portion of the brand’s ID. Ogilvy China creative head Graham Fink says he saw Mak’s tribute to Jobs and went to meet the young designer. “I saw the rest of his student work (he’s on his second year at university studying graphics). A few months later I asked him if he could work with me on the idea of 'sharing a coke’ for Coca Cola. A few weeks later he sent me a rough layout with these two hands sharing the bottle, based on Coke’s iconic white ribbon. I thought it was brilliant, so simple and a classic case of less is more. Fast-forward to me sharing the idea with our client and the rest is history. I take my hat off to this young man. He is a great up-and-coming talent.”

2. Lego Super Hero Movie Maker
The most popular analog toy ever gained a whole other life with the advent of DIY web video. Creators and viewers alike never seem to tire of Lego reinterpretations of everything from sporting events to Internet memes.
So it was only fitting that the brand get in on the action with an app to help anyone with an iPhone create their own Lego-based movie. Agency Pereira & O’Dell worked with Lego to launch the DC Super Hero Movie Maker app, which allows users to create and edit scenes DC Universe Super Heroes, complete with title cards and music.

1. Prometheus "Happy Birthday David"
Ridley Scott’s Prometheus is one of the most anticipated films of the summer--one of those rare cases where the product may actually live up to the long-lead frenzy. And so far, the campaign supporting the film has lived up to the promise of the movie.

The campaign has employed a number of interesting, bespoke elements that have revealed elements of the film’s story in a high-toned, suspense-building fashion.
The latest promo comes in the form of an unusual two-and-a-half minute web film featuring David, an advanced android from Weyland Industries, the fictional company at the center of Scott’s film. The spot, directed by Little Minx/RSA’s Johnny Hardstaff, shows that David (Michael Fassbender) is eerily human and sets up one of the film’s plotlines while standing on its own as a compelling bit of film. An earlier promo for the film came in the form of a TED talk from the future delivered by Weyland’s CEO (played by Guy Pearce).

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1 Comments

  • Suleman Ali

    Blade Runner probably still ranks as the film that raises the most profound questions of what it is to be human in that the replicants have a tragic fate. In creating a creature that recognises its own existence, we are also likely to cause it to have deep existential issues.  Whilst David from Prometheus would make a wonderful son-in-law, I wonder to what extent the film fully exploits the opportunity to ask big questions.